EVERYTHING YOU WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT INDIANS BUT WERE AFRAID TO ASK (Young Readers Edition) by Anton Treuer


Publisher: Levine Querido
Release Date: April 6, 2021

“Why are Indians so often imagined rather than understood?”

Ojibwe author and professor Dr. Anton Treuer tackles this question and dozens more in this engaging and informative book, perfect for young readers and adults alike. I learned so much from this book, including Indigenous history and the lives of Natives today. The Q&A format makes the information easily accessible, while the author’s personal writing style will keep readers interested.

There were so many eye-opening parts to this book, covering topics like mascots, stereotypes, sovereignty, blood quantum, and residential boarding schools. A personal story the author shared about his treatment by police after being stopped while driving with his wife really stuck with me. Also, I went to the University of Kansas, and I had no idea about the cemetery and its history at Haskell Indian Nations University, which was just down the street.

I borrowed this book from the library, but I’m planning to get a copy of my own. This would make a wonderful reference guide for social studies classrooms too. โ€” ๐““๐“ฒ๐“ช๐“ท๐“ช

2021 NATIONAL PARK FOUNDATION PLANNER


Publisher: Sourcebooks
Release Date: September 1, 2020
Source: Review copy from the publisher
Rating: โ˜…โ˜…โ˜…โ˜…โ˜…


The official planner of the National Park Foundation!

From the National Park Foundation, the official non-profit partner of America’s National Parks, comes this remarkable 2021 planner filled with breathtaking photographs from America’s beautiful national parks. Each week showcases photos and detailed information about National Park Foundation-supported sites, plus significant anniversaries and events in National Park Foundation history.

Planner features include:

โ€ข 12-month planner;
โ€ข 6″ x 9″ with wire-o binding;
โ€ข FSC certified responsible, smudge-free paper;
โ€ข Two pages of practical and fun stickers;
โ€ข Internal storage pocket;
โ€ข Sturdy jacket for durability;
โ€ข Removable cover band


This beautiful spiral-bound 2021 planner would be perfect for national park explorers and armchair travelers alike. The National Park Foundation’s vision is “to inspire all people to connect with and protect America’s national parks,” and the photographs in this planner are truly inspiring.

The first few pages list national parks by state, and also those that cover multiple states, with checkboxes if you want to mark where you’ve been. There’s a 2021 “at a glance” calendar showing the whole year, followed by a monthly calendar, and then weekly calendars with plenty of room for writing.

The weekly calendars feature a gorgeous photo of a different national park on the opposite page, as well as a brief description and things to do and see. In addition there are fun stickers (including goals, to do, meeting, birthday, etc.) to add to your calendar pages. This planner would make a great gift for outdoor enthusiasts who want to get organized!

See more pictures of the 2021 National Park Foundation Planner on my Instagram post HERE!

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Disclosure: I received a copy of this planner through Sourcebooks’ Early Reads program in exchange for an honest review.

CLIMATE CHANGE FOR BABIES by Chris Ferrie @SourcebooksKids


Publisher: Sourcebooks Explore
Release Date: August 18, 2020
Source: Review copy from the publisher
Rating: โ˜…โ˜…โ˜…โ˜…โ˜…


A colorfully simple explanation of the science behind climate change, from the #1 science author for kids!

Climate Change for Babies is an engaging, basic introduction for youngsters (and grownups!) to the complex questions of what climate change is and what we can do about it. Full of scientific information and written by experts, this timely installment of the Baby University board book series is perfect for enlightening the next generation of geniuses. After all, it’s never too early to become a scientist!


Thank you to the publisher for the review copy of CLIMATE CHANGE FOR BABIES. This simple yet informative board book is meant for the youngest of book lovers, but its message on climate change will educate readers of all ages. The drawings and colors will draw the attention, but it’s the lesson that’s important. The author uses terms and concepts that very young children can relate to, such as referring to our atmosphere as a blanket, and that global warming makes us too hot under the blanket. I’m sure the pictures of cows passing gas will have kiddos giggling. Not only does the book explain what happens when we don’t take care of our home planet, it presents ways we can help the Earth before it’s too late.

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THOUGHTS ON BOOKS (#5): Wicked Plants (Audiobook) / An American Witch in Paris


Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed Lincoln's Mother and Other Botanical Atrocities
Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed Lincoln’s Mother and Other Botanical Atrocities by Amy Stewart
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

WICKED PLANTS was an Audible Daily Deal, and with that title and cover, I couldn’t resist downloading it. The book is a curious and often unsettling encyclopedia of plants that have caused harm in one way or another throughout the centuries. I don’t think a lot about plants being dangerous, but after reading this I definitely should. I was surprised that even some everyday foods can be harmful. (There’s a reason cashews aren’t sold in their shell.) However the most harmful of plants kills nearly 6 million people per year. (You can probably guess what it is.)

The audiobook was narrated by Coleen Marlo, and she did a fabulous job making each culprit plant seem down right sinister. I will say that I also checked out the hardcover of this book so I could see the illustrations and read the scientific names of all the plants. There were many presented and they moved by quickly, so it was nice to have a physical copy to reference.


An American Witch in Paris (Harlequin Nocturne)
An American Witch in Paris by Michele Hauf
My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

A straight-laced vampire and a saucy American witch come together in Paris to save humanity. Vampire Ethan and witch Tuesday are memorable leads, with an intriguing supporting cast aiding their perilous mission. The world-building and conflicts were exciting. I haven’t read a paranormal romance in a long time, so this book was a lot of fun. One thing that didn’t work for me was some of what Tuesday was saying or thinking didn’t fit with a centuries-old witch. (Example: She would call troublesome men “Richards” instead of … well, you know.) AN AMERICAN WITCH IN PARIS is loosely tied to others Michele Hauf has published with Nocturne, though it can easily be read stand-alone. Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for a review copy of this book.


โ€œIf you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.โ€ โ€• Marcus Tullius Cicero