THE BOOK WOMAN OF TROUBLESOME CREEK by Kim Michele Richardson {Review}


Publisher: Sourcebooks Landmark
Release Date: May 7, 2019
Source: Review copy from the publisher
Rating: ★★★★★


The hardscrabble folks of Troublesome Creek have to scrap for everything―everything except books, that is. Thanks to Roosevelt’s Kentucky Pack Horse Library Project, Troublesome’s got its very own traveling librarian, Cussy Mary Carter.

Cussy’s not only a book woman, however, she’s also the last of her kind, her skin a shade of blue unlike most anyone else. Not everyone is keen on Cussy’s family or the Library Project, and a Blue is often blamed for any whiff of trouble. If Cussy wants to bring the joy of books to the hill folks, she’s going to have to confront prejudice as old as the Appalachias and suspicion as deep as the holler.

Inspired by the true blue-skinned people of Kentucky and the brave and dedicated Kentucky Pack Horse library service of the 1930s, The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek is a story of raw courage, fierce strength, and one woman’s belief that books can carry us anywhere―even back home.


Cussy Mary was such a compelling and unique character in this novel set in depression-era Kentucky. I warmed to her and her amazing story right away.

Part of President Roosevelt’s plan to bring jobs to struggling rural areas was the Pack Horse Library Project. Working for this program, Cussy and her mule delivered second-hand books to the poorest of mountain folks surrounding Troublesome Creek.

Cussy was called Bluet by many locals because of the uncommon color of her skin. She was a descendant of the blue-skinned people of Kentucky, and she faced cruelty and discrimination because of it. This book brilliantly brought to life what was going on in this time and place, all the hardships and hopes of this impoverished mining community.

THE BOOK WOMAN OF TROUBLESOME CREEK was a wonderful & emotional journey, and I loved it! Cussy the Book Woman is a character who will stay with you long after finishing this absorbing piece of Southern historical fiction.

Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

THE SILENT PATIENT by Alex Michaelides {Review}

The Silent Patient
The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Quick Thoughts: Brilliant! Psychotherapist Theo Faber is treating a new patient named Alicia, a woman who killed her husband, then never spoke another word. For six years, no one has been able to get through to Alicia, but Theo is determined. Oh my, what secrets she hides in her vault! I loved how this story was constructed, alternating between Theo’s POV and Alicia’s diary entries. There’s so much going on beneath the surface. Has a fantastic twisty ending that I did not see coming. THE SILENT PATIENT is an impressive debut novel — can’t wait for more from Alex Michaelides! Borrowed from the library. ♥

THE SHADOW GUEST by Hillary Waugh {Review}

The Shadow Guest
The Shadow Guest by Hillary Waugh
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

THE SHADOW GUEST is a fantastic mystery/suspense novel from the vintage Gothic fiction genre. An American couple, Howard and Angela, move to a cottage on the coast of England after her breakdown.

Howard is hesitant to be so secluded with their medical issues, but some strange force compels Angela to stay at Heather Cottage. Even with unexplained happenings at night – frightening noises, shadowy figures, and bizarre dreams – Angela refuses to leave. Is there something supernatural afoot? Or does someone want them gone?

I enjoyed this creepy book very much. The author created the perfect atmosphere of sinister suspense. Best of all I had absolutely no clue what the ending would bring. So twisted! ♥ My copy of THE SHADOW GUEST was published by Dell in July 1972.

BLOOD ORANGE by Harriet Tyce {Review}


Publisher: Grand Central Publishing
Release Date: February 19, 2019
Source: Borrowed from the library
Rating: ★★★★★


A young lawyer’s outwardly perfect life spirals out of control as she takes on her first murder case in this dark and twisty debut thriller for readers of Paula Hawkins, A.J. Finn, or Shari Lapena.

Alison has it all. A doting husband, adorable daughter, and a career on the rise–she’s just been given her first murder case to defend. But all is never as it seems…

Just one more night. Then I’ll end it.

Alison drinks too much. She’s neglecting her family. And she’s having an affair with a colleague whose taste for pushing boundaries may be more than she can handle.

I did it. I killed him. I should be locked up.

Alison’s client doesn’t deny that she stabbed her husband – she wants to plead guilty. And yet something about her story is deeply amiss. Saving this woman may be the first step to Alison saving herself.

I’m watching you. I know what you’re doing.

But someone knows Alison’s secrets. Someone who wants to make her pay for what she’s done, and who won’t stop until she’s lost everything…


BLOOD ORANGE is a book I discovered via my Instagram friends, and I’m so glad I moved it to the top of my TBR stack! The main character Alison is such a hot mess even though she may appear to have it all. Watching her go down a self-destructive path was not easy to read, but at the same time I could not look away. This is a complex, dark, and edgy thriller about poisonous relationships and destructive behavior. The ending was a shocker. An impressive debut from Harriet Tyce!

THE BROKEN GIRLS by Simone St. James {Review}


Publisher: Berkley
Release Date: March 20, 2018
Source: Review copy from the publisher
Rating: ★★★★★


Vermont, 1950. There’s a place for the girls whom no one wants–the troublemakers, the illegitimate, the too smart for their own good. It’s called Idlewild Hall. And in the small town where it’s located, there are rumors that the boarding school is haunted. Four roommates bond over their whispered fears, their budding friendship blossoming–until one of them mysteriously disappears…

Vermont, 2014. As much as she’s tried, journalist Fiona Sheridan cannot stop revisiting the events surrounding her older sister’s death. Twenty years ago, her body was found lying in the overgrown fields near the ruins of Idlewild Hall. And though her sister’s boyfriend was tried and convicted of murder, Fiona can’t shake the suspicion that something was never right about the case.

When Fiona discovers that Idlewild Hall is being restored by an anonymous benefactor, she decides to write a story about it. But a shocking discovery during the renovations will link the loss of her sister to secrets that were meant to stay hidden in the past–and a voice that won’t be silenced…


THE BROKEN GIRLS was an amazing book, combining many elements I love: mystery, ghost story, historical fiction, dual time periods, and crime drama. I loved it – yes, it was dark and unsettling, but I was glued to the pages.

The story alternates between the early 1950s and 2014 in a tiny Vermont town. In the past, four teenage girls attend a local boarding school for troubled girls called Idlewild Hall when one goes missing; in the present, a journalist named Fiona investigates the death of her sister whose body was found on Idlewild’s abandoned property two decades earlier. Fiona agrees to write an article on the restoration of Idlewild when it’s purchased by a mysterious buyer. During renovations, a shocking discovery pulls Fiona into the unsolved case of the missing girl. Will it also lead her to answers about her own sister’s death?

This was an atmospheric and creepy read, with some definite chilling moments. Like many Gothic novels, the house, Idlewild, was a haunted, complex character itself, and the tale of its resident ghost was heartbreaking. The mystery was complicated, and I enjoyed how the well-researched historical elements were woven into it. I love Simone St. James’ storytelling, and I’d recommend this book to anyone who likes a spooky story full of emotion and depth.

Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.